Educational Links


This page contains a number of educational and informational articles. Click or tap on the link in brown to jump directly to the article.


The DCCRC Flag – What Does It Mean?

The colours on the flag represent the four directions:
Yellow to the East, Red to the South, Black to the West and White to the North.

The turtle on the flag is a snapping turtle which appears in the Anishinaabe legend explaining the origin of North America or Turtle Island:

After a great flood, the snapping turtle offered his back as the foundation for a new Earth.   Nanaboozhoo (benefactor to the Anishinaabe people) put a small piece of earth on the snapping turtle’s back.  The wind blew from the Four Directions.

Then the island in the water grew larger and heavier, to what is now known as North America.  Please note that this is a short version of the creation of Turtle Island legend, the long version features the brave muskrat….  We encourage you to seek out the many adventurous versions of this story.  The turtle figure is used by several indigenous nations.

The 13 Moons on a Snapping Turtle’s back:

On a turtle’s back the pattern of scales establishes the combination of numbers that define the lunar calendar cycle.  The circle of scales that surround the edge add up to 28, the number of days that comprise the lunar cycle. (28 days from full moon to full moon).  The centre of the shell has a pattern of thirteen larger scales which represent the 13 moons of the lunar cycle.

Aboriginal calendars are not the same as our western calendar.  They are lunar calendars that are logical to a people who are closely linked to nature.  The different times of the moon are closely linked to corresponding important yearly events.

For example, in March: The third moon of Creation is Sugar Moon. As the maple sap begins to run, we learn of one of the main medicines given to the Anishinaabe which balances our blood and heals us.  During this time, we are encouraged to balance our lives as we would our blood sugar levels.   This moon also teaches us the time of year when the sap is running for maple sugar harvest.

The flag was designed by a DCCRC community member, Kristin Evensen, graphic designer.

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The Legend of the Three Sisters

There are several legends surrounding the Three Sisters; indeed, almost every American Indian nation seems to have its own. The Cherokee legend involves three women who helped each other stay fed, hydrated and strong on the Trail of Tears, a lesson that the Cherokee used in planting their crops when they arrived in the Oklahoma Territory. Another legend describes three sisters who bickered constantly until their mother gave each of them an egg cooked in a different way and showed the sisters that, although the textures of the eggs were different, they were still eggs.

This is one version of the Haudenosaunee legend of the Three Sisters:

Very long ago, there were three sisters who lived in a field. The youngest was so small she could not yet walk; she crawled along the ground, dressed in green. The middle sister wore a bright yellow dress and darted back and forth across the field. The eldest sister stood tall and straight, and her body bent with the wind. She had long yellow hair and wore a green shawl. The three sisters loved one another very much and could not imagine living without the others.

One day a little Indian boy came to the field. He was very handsome and knew the ways of the land. He could talk with the birds and the animals and was straight and fearless. The three sisters were very interested in this boy as they watched him use his stone knife to carve a bowl or hunt with his bow and arrow.

Late in the summer of the boy’s first visit to the field, the youngest of the three sisters disappeared. She was the one who could only creep along the ground; she could not even stand unless there was a stick she could cling to. But she was gone, and the other two sisters mourned her until the fall.

The Indian boy returned to the field to gather reeds that grew at the edge of a small stream. He used the reeds to make arrow shafts. The two remaining sisters again watched him, fascinated. That night, the second sister disappeared, the one who always wandered hither and yon.

Now there was only one sister left, the tall and straight sister. She did not bow her head in sorrow, though she mourned deeply and thought she could not live in the field alone without her sisters. As the days grew shorter and colder, her green shawl began to lose its color and her yellow hair became dry and tangled. Night and day she sighed for her sisters, but her voice was low like the wind, and no one heard her.

One day in the harvest season, the little Indian boy heard the third sister crying, and he felt sorry for her. He took her in his arms and carried her to his home, and there a delightful surprise awaited her: Her sisters were there in the lodge, safe and very glad to be reunited. They explained that they had been curious about the little Indian boy and had followed him home, and they had decided to stay because winter was coming and his home was warm and comfortable.

The sisters also were making themselves useful to the boy and his family. The youngest, now all grown up, kept the dinner pot full, while the second sister, still in her yellow dress, dried herself on the shelf so she could fill the dinner pot later in the winter. The eldest sister was so pleased to be with her sisters again and so impressed with the help they gave the boy that she too began drying herself so the family would have meal to use as the winter went on.

And from that day to this, the three sisters were never separated again.

Source: “The Three Sisters – Exploring an Iroquois Garden,” Cornell Cooperative Extension, 1997.

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Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada


The final report, titled Honouring the Truth, Reconciling for the Future, is the culmination of thousands of hours of heart-wrenching testimony heard in more than 300 communities over a span of six years, from more than 6,000 indigenous women and men who were abused and lived to tell their stories.

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The Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples.


The Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples (RCAP) was established by Order in Council on August 26, 1991, and it submitted in October 1996 the Report of the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples. The RCAP was mandated to investigate and propose solutions to the challenges affecting the relationship between Aboriginal peoples (First Nations, Inuit, Métis), the Canadian government and Canadian society as a whole.


Summary of Recommendations:
Download File

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They Came for the Children (Residential Schools)

For over 100 years, First Nations, Métis, and Inuit children were removed from their families and sent to institutions called residential schools. The government-funded, church-run schools were located across Canada and established with the purpose to eliminate parental involvement in the spiritual, cultural and intellectual development of Indigenous children. The last residential schools closed in the mid-1990s. During this chapter in Canadian history, more than 150,000 First Nations, Métis, and Inuit children were forced to attend these schools some of which were hundreds of miles from their home. The cumulative impact of residential schools is a legacy of unresolved trauma passed from generation to generation and has had a profound effect on the relationship between First Nations, Métis, and Inuit peoples and other Canadians.

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Dr. Cindy Blackstock

First Call: BC Child and Youth Advocacy Coalition 20th Anniversary Fundraising Dinner, January 31st, 2013. Click here to see the video.

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Dr. Lynn Gehl, Algonquin Anishinaabe-kwe

Lynn Gehl, PhD, is an Algonquin Anishinaabe-kwe. She is an advocate, artist, writer, and an outspoken critic of colonial law and policies that harm Indigenous women, men, children, and the Land. Her 2014 book based on her doctoral work “The Truth that Wampum Tells: My Debwewin on the Algonquin Land Claims Process” was published with Fernwood Publishing. Her 2017 book, titled “Claiming Anishinaabe: Decolonizing the Human Spirit”, explores her journey deeper into Indigenous knowledge and was published with the University of Regina Press.

In April 2017 Lynn was successful in defeating Indian and Northern Affairs Canada’s unstated paternity policy when the Court of Appeal for Ontario ruled the sex discrimination in the policy was unreasonable.Lynn Gehl, PhD, is an Algonquin Anishinaabe-kwe. She is an advocate, artist, writer, and an outspoken critic of colonial law and policies that harm Indigenous women, men, children, and the Land.

Her 2014 book based on her doctoral work “The Truth that Wampum Tells: My Debwewin on the Algonquin Land Claims Process” was published with Fernwood Publishing. Her 2017 book, titled “Claiming Anishinaabe: Decolonizing the Human Spirit”, explores her journey deeper into Indigenous knowledge and was published with the University of Regina Press.

In April 2017 Lynn was successful in defeating Indian and Northern Affairs Canada’s unstated paternity policy when the Court of Appeal for Ontario ruled the sex discrimination in the policy was unreasonable.

Black Face Blogger Click here
Community Publications Click here

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Ernesto Sirolli

“Want to Help Someone? Shut up and Listen”  TEDX Talk by Ernesto Sirolli on sustainable development Click here to see the video.

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The Native Women’s Association of Canada

The Native Women’s Association of Canada is pleased to announce the release of our new COMMUNITY RESOURCE GUIDE:

What Can I Do to Help the Families of Missing and Murdered Aboriginal Women and Girls? The CRG includes a poster, three fact sheets, 10 toolkits and other resources for educators as well as a CD for easy access to electronic files for printing and distribution. Some of the topics addressed in the CRG are: “Sisters In Spirit Vigils,” “Men as Effective Allies,” “Unlocking the Mystery of Media Relations,” “Navigating Victim Services,” and “Safety Measures for Aboriginal Women”.

NWAC encourages the use of the CRG for violence prevention activities, community support, capacity building and to promote healthy relationships.

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The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights

The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR) has released a ground breaking report on its investigation into the murders and disappearances of Aboriginal women and girls in British Columbia. The investigation was requested by the Native Women’s Association of Canada (NWAC) and FAFIA in March 2012. The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights has released a groundbreaking report on its investigation into the murders and disappearances of Aboriginal women and girls in British Columbia. The investigation was requested by the NWAC and FAFIA in March 2012.  Click here to read the full report.

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Human Rights Watch

“Those Who Take Us Away: Abusive Policing and Failures in Protection of Indigenous Women and Girls in Northern British Columbia”

This HUMAN RIGHTS WATCH report documents both ongoing police failures to protect indigenous women and girls in the north from violence and violent behaviour by police officers against women and girls. Police failures and abuses add to longstanding tensions between the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and indigenous communities in the region, Human Rights Watch said. The Canadian government should establish a national commission of inquiry into the murders and disappearances of indigenous women and girls, including the impact of police mistreatment on their vulnerability to violence in communities along Highway 16, which has come to be called northern British Columbia’s “Highway of Tears.”

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United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

Article 1 Indigenous peoples have the right to the full enjoyment, as a collective or as individuals, of all human rights and fundamental freedoms as recognized in the Charter of the United Nations, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and international human rights law.

Read the full PDF Article here

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Institute for Canadian Citizenship Guiding Principles

We believe…

1. Citizenship is an important bond that unites all Canadians.
2. Progressive integration policies (social, economic, political) positively reinforce the value of citizenship.
3. Aboriginal Culture is a founding pillar of Canadian society; the ICC builds upon Aboriginal Canadians’ traditions of welcoming others.

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Schooling the World 2010: White Man’s Last Burden

This is a must see documentary about the education system we have in place aimed at total erasure and annihilation of Indigenous nations, all nations. This education system is meant to create “workers” to benefit the elite and an economy that destroys and devastates the lands and waters. Click here to see the video.

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